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Diseases, Pests & Wildlife

A Pest Above the Rest – Japanese Beetles

It’s July and our gardens are in their prime! But wait, what is that insect on my beautiful roses? And why do the leaves on my raspberries look like skeletons? Read this article about the dreaded Japanese Beetle and what you can do to minimize the damage they cause.

Diseases, Pests & Wildlife

Bird Feeding

Bird-feeding is for all of us who enjoy and love watching birds. Inside this article you’ll find information on bird-feeding tips, preventing disease in your bird feeders and an update on the AVIAN (HPAI) bird flu that disrupted this summer’s bird-feeding habits.

Diseases, Pests & Wildlife

Boxelder Bugs

It’s cool but sunny outside and I would like to walk into my front door but the door and wall are covered with black and orange bugs! They are boxelder bugs and they are looking for a warm home for the winter. Read how to manage these nonharmful but annoying pests.

Diseases, Pests & Wildlife

Creeping Charlie (Glechoma hederacea}

Is creeping charlie an unwelcome intruder in your garden? Read this article to find out more about why this plant is so hard to eliminate and, even, how you can appreciate and even live with Creeping Charlie in your garden.

Diseases, Pests & Wildlife

Eastern Red Columbine (Aquilegia canadensis): Springtime Coquette

The Eastern Red Columbine is an erect, branching perennial, up to 2 ft. tall, and is well known for its showy red and yellow flowers. Here are some reasons why they may be a great addition to your landscape.

Diseases, Pests & Wildlife

Getting the Jump on Jumping Worms

Many of us associate worms in the soil as an indicator of “good garden soil.” Unfortunately, that is not necessarily true in Minnesota these days. “Jumping worms” have become more common in local gardens recently and that is not a good thing. Read this article to understand why.

Diseases, Pests & Wildlife

Identifying and Attracting Beneficial Insects

Now that the plants in our gardens are starting to bloom, we are also seeing insects on those plants. Some of those insects are certainly pests but others are actually beneficial. We know how pollinators are beneficial insects - many of the foods we enjoy rely on pollinators for fruit and seed development. But how do we identify other insects that are beneficial to our gardens and landscapes in other ways? Read this article to find out!

Diseases, Pests & Wildlife

Investigating Insects in the Garden

Calling all Family Insect Investigators! Along with plants and people enjoying the summer, many insects are traveling around in our yards and parks, too. Gather your family and friends in July to investigate insects in the Minnesota outdoors. Learn how to identify insects from other types of bugs, view some common Minnesota insects and how to do your own investigations of these creatures.

Diseases, Pests & Wildlife

Learn to Identify Garden Insects – Good and Bad

We know that most insects in our garden are beneficial. But when we find insect damage on our beloved flowers, vegetables and fruits, it’s hard not to focus on the damaging insects. A good gardening practice is to keep abreast of the latest research on how to attract good insects and adopt pest management practices to minimize damage from the “bad” insects. By seeking out research-based information on good and bad insects, you can learn about potential damage and a range of control options to make well-informed decisions about managing the pests in your Minnesota garden. Read this article to learn more about good and bad insects and how to tell the difference.

Diseases, Pests & Wildlife

Protecting Our Trees from Invasive Species

The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources defines an invasive species as “species that are not native to Minnesota and cause economic or environmental harm or harm to human health.” This article defines and identifies the invasive species that can cause harm to the economy, environment, or human health.

Diseases, Pests & Wildlife

Taking on Ticks

You’ve turned in after a productive day of gardening. Beginning to doze off, you feel something ever so slightly brushing against your thigh. You reach and feel a small hard object crawling up your leg. Lights on. It’s a tic, ambling along, looking for a nice warm place to suck your blood! It is tick season and there is good reason to be wary.

Diseases, Pests & Wildlife

Vexing Vole Damage

As the snow melts this spring, you may observe trails of dead grass in your yard. Or, you may find that the bark near the ground of your small trees or shrubs has been chewed bare. What is the cause of this damage that occurred over the winter? Most likely, the culprit is voles. Read this article learn more about voles and how you can reduce the damage they may bring to your yard.

Diseases, Pests & Wildlife

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